Tools For Teaching Critical Thinking

Originally developed by Rotman’s former dean, Roger Martin, integrative thinking is a broad term to describe looking for solutions through the tensions inherent in different viewpoints. Martin noticed that effective CEOs understood that their own world view was limited, so they sought out opposing viewpoints and came to creative solutions by leveraging seemingly opposing positions. For the past seven years, a spin-off group called the I-Think Initiative has been training teachers in the Toronto area on how integrative thinking can build critical thinking in students from a young age.

LADDER OF INFERENCE 

One of the tools Jason Watt learned about in his training is called the ladder of inference. It’s a model for decision making behavior developed by Harvard professors Chris Argyris and Donald Schön. Essentially, it helps students slow down and realize which data they are taking into account when they make a decision and how the data they choose is informed by their past experiences. Assumptions are often made in a split second decision because the brain is wired to prioritize data that confirms the model a person already holds. The ladder of inference is a way to check those assumptions.


Watt first used the ladder in a very basic way; he showed his grade two students an image of a soccer player lying on the ground, one leg up, holding his head. The image was intentionally a little vague. At first Watt’s students concluded that the man had fallen. But as they worked their way up the ladder of inference they began to notice different aspects of the image and add those to their “data pool.”

“Students started to realize there was a lot more going on in the picture just in terms of data than what they first said,” Watt said. For example, students would say the man was hurt. That’s not a data point, it’s an inference. Watt could tease out from them that they thought the man was hurt because he was on the ground, holding his head and had a pained look on his face. “I started getting much deeper, more thoughtful answers from students,” Watt said.

As students practiced using the ladder of inference in various content areas they also started to use it on their own when dealing with social problems. When there is a disagreement, students now use the ladder of inference to back up and think through the data they chose and the assumptions that stemmed from that data. Watt says now students solve problems on their own or ask a friend to help them make their ladders.

“We’ve learned that there’s nothing wrong with questioning, so the kids have become much more willing and accepting of criticism because it’s not really criticism anymore,” Watt said. He feels the integrative thinking tools have naturally encouraged his students to build a growth mindset about all aspects of life because multiple viewpoints or ways to solve a problem are a core part of why integrative thinking works. Difference is the strength of the model.

PRO/PRO

Another integrative thinking tool called the pro/pro chart offers some good examples of how students are learning to think flexibly. Most people are familiar with pro/con charts, but in a pro/pro chart the group thinks through the positives of two different ideas. Rather than deciding between two choices, this tool helps students identify the positive traits of different viewpoints, and then create a third option by merging the good qualities of both.

Watt asked his students to brainstorm ideas for the worst restaurant of all time. When they had a good list of terrible ideas, Watt then asked groups of students to each take one idea and explain why it was the best restaurant of all time. One group had initially proposed a restaurant with no seating would be the worst; they reframed that to say if everyone was standing up they would move through the restaurant faster and turn more of a profit. A second group had said a restaurant in the woods would be terrible; they reframed that as dining under the stars.

“They were coming up with these really good ideas out of a terrible idea,” Watt said. “It helps kids see that they are capable and switches those mindsets.” Watt built on the activity, asking the groups to pitch their ideas in a Shark Tank or Dragon’s Den style contest. Students came up with hilarious slogans and designs for their restaurants and what started as a silly, fun activity became a rich interdisciplinary project with written and oral communication, presentation skills, media literacy, and of course, the process skills that enable them.

“The students now are no longer afraid to think,” Watt said. “They’re being more creative thinkers.” He even uses integrative thinking in math instruction, asking students to use the ladder of inference to determine information in a word problem, or asking them to do Pro/Pro charts for different multiplication strategies and then letting them come up with their own third way. His students’ math scores started skyrocketing, and even better, they no longer felt they weren’t “math people.”

PROVOKING SELF REFLECTION

Jennifer Warren became curious about integrative thinking through her daughter who kept coming home from her grade six classroom saying things like, “we had the most interesting discussion today.” That piqued Warren’s interest.

“The way she was talking about her own thinking developing, I was kind of thinking I didn’t think my students were saying the same kind of things,” Warren said. She wanted to be sure she was provoking the same response from her high school English students at Dundas Valley Secondary School in Hamilton. So when her board of education decided to fund the I-Think training she signed up.

The integrative thinking tools gave Warren a solution to a problem she and many other teachers have struggled with for a long time: how to deepen student thinking. Until then, Warren had tried to do this by modeling what deep thinking looks like. She was confident she could help any student become a strong writer. But the integrative thinking training forced her to ask some hard questions about her instruction and prompted her realization that her students were recreating her example, not creating in on their own.

“It completely flipped what mattered to me in an English classroom,” Warren said. She used to be mostly concerned with the product. Now, “instead of defending a stance, I’m so much more interested in having students reflect on their stance and shift and explain why they shifted. That metacognitive piece is more interesting to me now.”

CAUSAL MODELS

Warren starts the first semester by asking students to do a causal model -- another core integrative thinking tool -- of their values. She asks them to pick three to five things they value, anything from profound qualities like independence or kindness, to passions like music or hockey. They then having to dive deeply into why they value those qualities, what caused that? Often this requires them to have conversations with family about values taught to them from a young age.

She then asks them to make visual representations of their causal models and present them to one another. “I like that because they realize people don’t value the same things that they do,” Warren said. Those causal models go up on the wall as a reminder that everyone in the class is different and that the diversity of values, perspectives and opinions makes them better problem solvers.

Warren teaches a course for students who failed the Ontario literacy exam, a graduation requirement. The kids in this class often don’t have a lot of self confidence and are often missing some key literacy skills, like the ability to elaborate on a topic in writing. The ladder of inference has been an incredible tool to help Warren walk students through their thinking, modeling the tool step by step, climbing up or down the ladder as students offer insights from the text.

“It was such a simple and elegant way to allow someone who couldn’t wrap their head around inferring to do it well,” Warren said. She thinks the visual of a ladder helped these struggling students pin their thoughts to different steps and make connections.

She’s also found the tool to be helpful when she has disagreements with students. She’ll use the language of the tools to describe to students what data she’s using to make conclusions about their work ethic, their attendance, their behavior. But she always asks, “What am I missing.”

“It changes the conversation,” Warren said. It gives her a voice to express her disappointment to students in a way that is transparent and uses the shared language of their critical thinking tools. And because integrative thinking is based on the fact that one’s understanding of something is always incomplete, constantly shifting, there is room for students to be participants in the conversation.

TRUE COLLABORATION

“I’m completely and utterly blown away whenever I use one of these tools with my kids,” said Kristen Slinger, a grade two teacher at Norseman Junior Middle School. Before learning about integrative thinking, Slinger would have said she has been doing collaboration in the classroom for the past ten years. But she’s shifted her definition of collaboration and now sees what she was doing before as merely asking kids to write on the same piece of paper.

“When you use these tools [students] realize that they hit a roadblock when not everyone is participating,” Slinger said. The natural need for every students’ voice in order to solve the problem creates genuine collaboration.

Slinger remembers one boy who came from a Montessori background. He was used to a small school and small classes and was overwhelmed when he joined her class of 20 and the broader school of close to 700 students. Slinger said he was selectively mute until Christmas, an issue she raised with his mother. The news came as a surprise to his mom who said he was very chatty at home. Slinger kept the boy in a consistent group so he could develop trust with a few peers and slowly he realized that they really wanted to hear his opinion.


“It would have taken me probably months longer to get him to that point, but it was that idea that his peers valued what he had to say,” Slinger said. He went from never talking in class to volunteering to be the student who went around to other classes polling students on their favorite lemonade for a project.

Slinger said before she learned about integrative thinking she would get interesting responses from students, but she wouldn’t know how they got to their conclusions. The integrative thinking tools help make student thinking visible. “It’s the thinking that’s been put into the responses and the way it’s been broken down,” Slinger said. When she can see the steps of their thinking she has more ways to push them to go even further.

“I haven’t take a course in a very long time that has reshaped my entire program,” she said.

GETTING STARTED

“The safest way in was by using fiction stories,” Slinger said of her own attempts to use integrative thinking. “Find that story that maybe has that emotional clincher that may have different endings and then stop there and use the ladder of inference to come up with what they think might happen at the end.”

Jason Watt suggests starting with an activity that’s part of the curriculum every year. That way a teacher new to the practice can compare the kind of thinking students demonstrate when using an integrative thinking tool with their previous lesson plan.

One important element of success is choosing a topic that’s engaging to kids, that has multiple entry points and solutions, and that has a real stakeholder. “One of the biggest mistakes is when you give the tension without the problem to be solved from a particular perspective,” said Nogah Kornberg, Associate Director of the I-Think Initiative at the Rotman School of Management.

For example, a grade one teacher offered her students a challenge from the school’s janitor. In the summer the trash is stored outside and becomes infested with bees. In the winter the trash is stored inside and smells bad. What might be a better solution? Giving students the challenge from the perspective of the stakeholder helps them solve the problem for him. If it is just presented as an A or a B solution, they don’t know who to solve for.

Kornberg was a high school teacher herself before becoming part of the I-Think Initiative. She sees the program as offering two things: critical thinking skills and building better citizens.

“We’re seeing quite young students learning how to play the game of school and this is about how to become good thinkers and good questioners of our thinking,” she said. Getting started on this metacognition piece can’t start too young in her opinion. She also sees the tool as a way to empower young people. “Because it’s rooted in problem solving it’s about saying things are the way they are, but we can make them better and I have a responsibility to make them better.”

Rahim Essabhai wholeheartedly agrees with Kornberg; he’s seen the shift in his students. He teaches a class called Business and Cooperative Education for seniors at John Polanyi Collegiate Institute that asks students to work on what big problem for an outside organization over the course of the school year.

“When I have my kids coming back to visit me and they say that this course has gotten them ready for the next stage more than any course they took in high school, I don’t take that lightly,” Essabhai said. And since students are coming up with interesting solutions to problems real businesses and organizations have, they see that their thinking has value.

And he knows students are using the tools beyond his course as well. In a final reflection for his class, one student described how she constantly found herself having to choose between hanging out with her friends and spending time with her little sister. When she did either she felt bad, so she came up with a third option. Once a month she hosted a gathering for all her friends and their little sisters to spend time together.

“They’re not being a passenger in their own life,” Essabhai said. “Nothing is too messy or too tough.” Growing students who feel that way about tough challenges should be an essential function of education.

Here's a challenge for your students to tackle:


Students nowadays are experiencing an education system which rapidly changes from time to time through implementation of many educational technologies. Learning strategies, teaching processes and roles of teachers, students, parents and administrators

have been upgrading continually in accordance with the demands of 21st century education.

21st century education doesn’t just require good grades, it helps students to become independent learners. It also has a set of skills which we can call as, “21st century skills”.

Let’s have a glance at the list of 21st century skills:

  • Creativity
  • Critical thinking
  • Cultural Awareness
  • Problem solving
  • Innovation
  • Civic engagement
  • Communication
  • Productivity
  • Collaboration
  • Accountability
  • Exploration
  • Initiative
  • Responsibility
  • Leadership

In addition to the above mentioned skills, there are many more skills that 21st century students are required to have. It’s difficult to cover the information about all the 21st century skills in one guide so I’m writing this guide with focus more on two important 21st century skills, Critical thinking and Problem solving. As we know 21st century students will have the jobs that don’t even exist yet, students must have problem solving and critical thinking skills. Let’s learn about them.

Critical thinking:

Critical thinking is a way of deciding whether a claim is true, partially true, or false. 21st century education’s main objective is to help students think critically and not just take in things like a parrot. Critical thinking leads to skills that can be learned, mastered and used. It is the rational examination of ideas, inferences, assumptions, principles, arguments, conclusions, issues, statements, beliefs & actions.

Problem solving:

Problem solving, the term itself indicates that it’s an approach of solving problems or finding solutions to problems. From students to professionals, everyone experiences problems from time to time. Some problems are complicated while many others are easily solved. For every task or work we perform, there are many challenges and issues that make it difficult to complete. 21st century education involves teaching approaches that help students become capable to solve problems that arise in their job, education or life.

Similarity between Critical thinking & Problem solving:

Critical thinking is defined as meaningful, unbiased decisions or judgments based on the use of interpretation, analysis, evaluation, inferences, and explanations of information as it relates to the evidence applied to a specific discipline. Critical thinking differs from student to student as they have different interpretations.  

Problem solving is the ability to find solutions to problems, overcome challenges, completing difficult tasks through techniques, etc.

Both critical thinking and problem solving are similar as their design is to approach and tackle different challenges. Both critical thinking and problem solving (creative problem solving) involves the following procedure:

  • Identify an objective
  • Conduct research
  • Generate ideas
  • Develop solutions
  • Check whether or not the solutions are appropriate.

(Educators’ point of view) Why 21st century students need Critical thinking and Problem solving skills and how educators can improve these skills:

Critical thinking:

Many students have access to technology as well as technological devices and most of them know how to blog, micro blog, connect and collaborate with others through social media, explore and exchange knowledge about any concept, etc. Despite having many educational technologies, students still find it difficult to reach higher learning standards. This is because they’re not being selective in thetechnologies they use. Students nowadays still lack the ability to critically decipher through the “hits” they find on a Google search, and many do not understand the concept of a digital foot-print. Jules, an English teacher, has shared a practice that is being implemented in her school to improve creative thinking of students. Let’s learn about it.

“Many students do not think critically about the sources they select from online sites. We designed and implemented a four year research strategy at my high school that includes Boolean logic, searching for sources, determining the sources credibility, how to differentiate primary and secondary sources, checking how often the material is updated (if ever), etc. I teach mostly seniors and find that most do question the validity of blogs versus articles citing expert opinion, but that does not translate necessarily to them choosing better sources or seeking to find answers that aren’t already provided for them in some way. Thanks for posting. The need and ability of youth to critically think about the media in which they daily engage is increasingly necessary.” says Jules.

“Why” can make students think critically:

According to me, the word or the question “Why” is a great sign of “Critical thinking”. Most of the students just follow what they’ve learnt from teachers, books, or any digital sources. But few students try to learn about what it is and ask why it is being followed. This enthusiastic nature makes them special from the rest of the world.

“In Math, critical thinking usually comes when students ask why, rather than taking what we learn at face value”, says Graham Johnson, Math Department Head -Okanagan Mission Secondary & Instructional Designer - Thinkable Institute

“Learning stops at an answer - thinking happens during questioning. ““Why” is always a great question” - Gary Strickland ‏, HS physics and IPC teacher.

#MysterySkype improves Critical thinking & Collaboration skills among students:

Many educators find MysterySkype as a great tool to promote collaboration among students and improve critical thinking skills.

Mystery Skype is an educational game, invented by teachers, played by two classrooms on Skype. The aim of the game is to guess the location of the other classroom by asking each other questions. It's suitable for all age groups and can be used to teach subjects like geography, history, languages, mathematics and science.

I’d like to provide you with a link on which Paul Solarz has shared his experience of using #MysterySkype.

Solarz has written the whole procedure of the Mystery Skype, his ways of finding partners to play the game, the questioning model, and etc. Read this blog post to know more about it. 

In addition, there are many more important things to know about Critical thinking and also numerous teaching practices to implement it. We’d like to have your views on this. Please share with us in the comment box.

Problem solving:

Einstein's problem-solving formula:

Jeffrey Phillips, an author and an innovation consultant, once shared “When asked how he would spend his time if he was given an hour to solve a thorny problem, (Einstein) said he'd spend 55 minutes defining the problem and alternatives and 5 minutes solving it. Which is exactly opposite of what the vast majority of executives today would do.”

Educational institutions must realize the fact that thinking of different alternatives helps student improves his problem solving skills rather than teaching him a unique procedure to tackle a problem.

‘Asking “Why” 5 times’ can find the root of any problem:

When students learn at higher pace, they’ll experience many challenges and they need to tackle different situations. Let me explain the basic model of this approach:

Students:

For example, if you failed to answer a Math problem, ask these questions.

  1. Why didn’t I answer the question? ( Because I didn’t get sufficient time )
  2. Why it took longer time? (Because the concept was very difficult for me)
  3. Why it was difficult only for me? (Because I got stuck at a certain step)
  4. Why I got stuck particularly at that step? (Because I didn’t practice it)
  5. Why didn’t I practice it? ( Because I thought I could do it easily without practice)

Teaching them “How to Code” improves problem solving skills:

Bill Gates once said, “Everybody in this country should learn how to program a computer, because it teaches how to think.” The main reason why young students should be encouraged to learn coding is because it’s a basic computer literacy which helps them understand the logic and challenges behind this digital world.

LeighMarburyNichols, a Math educator, suggests other educators to encourage students to ask questions, answer each and every query of them clearly with patience. Students should get all their questions clarified; this is the best way to improve their problem solving and critical thinking skills.

The above mentioned are the few teaching methodologies to improve problem solving and critical thinking skills. We’d like to have more practices that improve students’ problem solving and critical thinking skills. Please feel free add your views in the comment box. 


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Devotee of Dr. Abdul Kalam. Following his path of Creating Creative Education in India. Contributing my works in "India Vision 2020". Former EdTech Blogger/Researcher at ETR India
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